Mark J. Terry

Mark Terry, PhD, is a Contract Faculty member at York University, Toronto, and Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, Ontario. He teaches courses on ecocinema, geomedia, environmental communication, and film history.

He has addressed world leaders and delegates in conjunction with the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change at COP15 following screenings of his films, The Antarctica Challenge – A Global Warning’ in 2009 and The Polar Explorer’ in 2010. He also sat down with policymakers to draft new rising sea level policy: Enhanced Action on Adaptation: Section II, Subsection 25 of the Cancun Accord. Recently, Dr. Terry created a GIS map pinning videos created by youth 18 to 30 that focus on environmental issues around the world. The project is called the Youth Climate Report.

Dr. Terry’s research in the field of environmental communications is documented in the critically-acclaimed book called The Geo-Doc: Geomedia, Documentary Film, and Social Change, published by Palgrave Macmillan.

He is an experienced media artist and researcher on many subjects (climate change, polar regions, documentary film theory, commercial theatre, exploration, and Hollywood musicals), speaking at many conferences on these topics. Having worked in the entertainment industry before returning to school in 2014 to get his Master’s and PhD, Dr. Terry has had the opportunity to write and narrate several projects for film and television.

Students love his way of communicating and have recently nominated him for ‘Professor of the Year’ at York University. He combines a facility with academic terms mixed with language that best reaches his targeted audience and makes complex thoughts easy to comprehend. His film students compiled this video to show their appreciation of his approach to teaching.

Dr. Terry is prepared to lecture on his experiences with the United Nations developing international environmental policy as well as a variety of academic subjects such as documentary film and theory, eco-cinema, climate change, and the polar regions, among other subjects.